Tag Archives: Spanglish

What are “estadounidismos”?

Standard

The Royal Spanish Academy (RAE – Real Academia de la Lengua Española) has admitted the inclusion of “estadounidismos” for the next edition of its dictionary.  The “estadounidismos” are the words or uses that are characteristic of the Spanish spoken in the United Stated of America (according to the DRAE – Diccionario de la Real Academia de la Lengua Española). Some of these new words include the following: “email”, “hispanounidense”, “paralegal” (asistente de abogados), “van” (microbús), “aplicar” (from apply, which means solicitar); “departamento” (of a Ministry, not only in the sense of an apartment), “parada” (from parade, which means desfile); or “elegible” (from eligible, which means beneficiario).

According to Gerardo Piña-Rosales, president of the North American Academy of the Spanish Language (ANLE – Academia Norteamericana de la Lengua Española ), the inclusion of those terms by the RAE shows the growing influx of the Spanish language in the United States.  However, it is necessary to distinguish the “estadounidismos” from the “spanglish”. The first implies the use of some words admitted by the RAE, while the latter involves the mix of both languages: Spanish and English.

You can find the whole article for your Spanish practice here:  “Los ‘estadounidismos’ entran en el diccionario de la RAE”, by Eva Sáiz. El País (October 15th, 2012).

Films in “Spanglish”

Standard

The article below highlights the constant switch between the Spanish and English languages and the use of Spanglish in the Oliver Stone film “Savages” (Salvajes), which includes on its cast the actors Salma Hayek and Benicio del Toro.  This is not the only film that has included the use of Spanglish, but what is interesting here is that through this film it is displayed the importance of the Spanish language in the United States.  As it is indicated in the final part of the article: “… this time it seems that Stone knew how to capture the inalienable truth that the Spanish language should not be seen as a minor language and that North Americans must assume that they need to know the essential expressions of the language that is spoken beyond Rio Grande, since there are many millions of Hispanics that crossed its rich waters in order to settle in the old British colony, but without forgetting their mother tongue.”

Enjoy the reading in Spanish by clicking the following: Películas en “spanglish”, by Javier Parra

In: http://www.practicaespanol.com (October 1st, 2012).